Rite of Passage

I have opened bank accounts for all the children and put money-gifts from birthdays and Christmas in them. Until now, I have always done it for them. They don't know what goes on, how much money they have or how it got there. No money lessons to be learned here.

Lately Dylan has been very intrigued with money. We 'trade' all day long. "Mom, can I give you 6 quarters, 4 dimes and ten pennies for a toonie?" or "Mom, I need a $10 bill. Can I give you a $5 bill, two toonies and a loonie?" There are times in my day where I just have to say, "Okay, trading is over for the day." It's as if I'm the official bank or a stock market or something. I have to say, his interest in how it works sure helps with our math lessons!

I have also been paying him small amounts for things he does around the house. He has his regular chores, but if these are done, he has earned the right to work for pay. (Mean mom, eh?) For example, a load of laundry washed, dried, folded and put away earns him a quarter. (Dwayne says it's slave labour. I say it's a good way for him to learn to work and have a chance to plunk something into his piggy bank.) Yesterday, he asked to roll my loose change. I told him I'd give him a quarter if he sorted the money into types of coins and another quarter for sorting piles of the proper amounts to fit into each roll. (Okay, how many of you homeschool moms are loving this...math lessons that I have to pay to teach him!)
After he finishes sorting these piles of coins, he asks if he can set up his very own bank account. So I call the bank to see if there is an appointment time available and off we toddle to set it up...



The banking officer treated him like a real little gentleman. She explained everything nice and clearly to him...

He looked it over...

and then signed it.

Then she escorted him over to the teller, where he deposited his $9.91. He asked the teller, a few times, in a few different ways, how he could be sure that he would get that money back when he wanted it. He wasn't about to give up all that hard-earned money to never see it again! She patiently explained it all and sent him on his way with his new deposit book.

I sure am thankful for people who treat my children like real people. When they patiently (and clearly) explain things to them, it makes them feel good. And it's such a great opportunity to learn to converse with adults and find out the information that they would like to know. I usually just stand back and watch it happen. And I must say, it makes me feel good to see my 5-year-old boy looking adults in the eye and communicating clearly with them.

2 comments:

USAincognito said...

What a great idea for teaching your son about consumer math! :) And how wonderful of the people at the bank to take the time to help him understand everything!!

Kysha said...

Oh that's so sweet! My gang has been trying to remind me to take them to their bank so that they can make their little deposits also. It's so cute. Such a great lesson in saving.